Tag Archives: mental health

Did you know that15 minutes of mental health hygiene can change your whole day?

Incorporating a daily stress-relief exercise into your routine not only helps you feel better now, but research suggests that it may also enhance your overall well-being in the future.

The cleanliness is seen in the reduction of cortisol levels, which is the primary stress hormone. When you begin with a clear, peaceful mind, you have a calm reference point to which you may look back when things become tough. The goal, according to mental health consultant David Sawyer, is to establish a baseline sensation that will help you feel better while you go about your daily activities. In his words, it is only a matter of learning to handle and nourish that inner space with awareness.

Daily writing and trying various hobbies might assist you in identifying what activities make you feel the most tranquil and stress-relieved in the long run. According to psychologist Tom Sawyer, you may begin to seek to check in with your mental state at increasingly frequent intervals during the day. Sawyer recommends including some kind of low-impact physical exercise into your schedule at least three days a week, such as walking, riding, or yoga. If you can, schedule some time at the end of the day to wind down and relax, he recommends. Step away from screens and decompress, he advises.

You might not have known this, but a study called “Landmark” found that people who smoke are more likely to get Alzheimer’s.

The biggest Alzheimer’s study ever finds new genes and pathways involved in disease progression.

silhouette of a person showing internal nervous system and brain on a blue background surrounded by dna

CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES

The groundbreaking study’s findings imply physicians can better anticipate whether a patient is genetically prone to Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s disease affects over 5.8 million Americans. Researchers from France’s Université de Lille performed the study. A genetic risk score may help determine who is most likely to develop Alzheimer’s.

To better understand Alzheimer’s and create medicines that delay or prevent the disease start, the research represents a huge step forward. The next stage is for researchers to concentrate on the study’s risk genes and their influence in brain cell malfunction and death.

What is Your Opinion on the Benefits of Coffee for Alzheimer’s Disease? Here’s What the Latest Research Says About the Link.

In a study evaluating the relationship between coffee and tea consumption and the risk of dementia and stroke, the researchers revealed that a certain number of cups consumed per day had the highest association with a decreased risk.

That is the message from recent research that is generating much attention. The research, published in the journal PLOS Medicine on November 16, assessed data from 365,682 adults aged 50 to 74 who took part in the UK Biobank. (If you are not acquainted with the UK Biobank, it is a large-scale biomedical database and research resource.) The health of the individuals and their coffee and tea consumption habits were monitored for 10 to 14 years.

During the research, 5,079 people got dementia, and 10,053 people had at least one stroke. The researchers examined persons who did not drink coffee or tea to those who did and discovered that those who enjoyed their brewed beverages had a reduced risk of stroke and dementia than abstainers. Those who drank two to three cups of coffee or three to five cups of tea per day had a decreased risk of dementia and stroke. Those who drank two to three cups of coffee and two to three cups of tea per day—so four to six cups of coffee and tea per day—had the most outstanding outcomes, with a 32% reduced risk of stroke and a 28% lower risk of dementia.

“We discovered that consuming coffee and tea individually or together was connected with a decreased risk of stroke and dementia,” the researchers concluded. “Consumption of coffee alone or in conjunction with tea was linked to a decreased incidence of poststroke dementia.”

It is worth noting that the research discovered merely a relationship, not causality. That is, the researchers did not discover that drinking coffee or tea reduces a person’s chance of dementia or stroke; instead, they discovered that persons who consume coffee and tea had a decreased risk of these primary health conditions. Scott Kaiser, MD, a geriatrician and the director of Geriatric Cognitive Health at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California, tells health that the correlation vs. causation component is critical. He emphasizes that the research “does not establish that consuming coffee or tea caused this decrease in risk.”

Doctors are still interested. “He is delighted that coffee drinking may reduce my own risk of dementia,” Amit Sachdev, MD, medical director in the Department of Neurology at Michigan State University, tells health.

This is not the first research to discover a correlation between coffee, in particular, and good health. For example, one research of over 468,000 adults, presented in August at the European Society of Cardiology, showed that drinking up to three cups of coffee per day is associated with a decreased risk of stroke and heart disease. In addition, a meta-analysis of 34,282 people’s data published in the journal Clinical Nutrition in 2016 discovered that drinking one or two cups of coffee per day is associated with a decreased risk of dementia.

Of course, there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. For example, research published earlier this year in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience discovered that consuming more than six cups of coffee each day increases your chance of developing dementia.

The “considerable disagreement” around the link between coffee and tea intake and stroke and dementia is one of the reasons the researchers claim they undertook this most recent study.

It is unclear why there could be a relationship between coffee and tea use and dementia and stroke risk—and the new research did not look into this. “While caffeine is undoubtedly a crucial shared denominator,” Dr. Kaiser explains, “coffee and tea are both derived from plants with many, many potentially beneficial chemical components, including strong antioxidants.” Any of these phytonutrients—chemicals produced by plants to maintain their health—”can really lower inflammation in our brains, protect brain cells from damage, improve learning and memory, and give other obvious advantages for brain health,” he continues.

All of this begs the question: Should the individual start drinking coffee or tea if the individuals are not already? Dr. Sachdev does not recommend it. “He is a little doubtful that this research will affect behavior,” he adds. “He would be more interested if a specific chemical in coffee or tea could be discovered.”

However, if one is already a coffee or tea user, individuals will be relieved to discover that the daily habit may be linked to a decreased risk of dementia and stroke.

Reference:

Korin Miller, Can Drinking Coffee Lower Your Dementia Risk? Here’s What New Research Says About the Association, November 17,Health. 2021.https://www.health.com/condition/neurological-disorders/coffee-and-dementia?fbclid=IwAR2DVl54rZI4I3zAbn17ZsGZxWaVD1CbzGXeTZl2e4qmFfIivm83a10yQj0

Amid COVID-19, Generation Z Activists Unite Against Racism and Mental Health

In his 2017 song “American Teen,” Khalid bemoaned that young people “don’t always express what they mean.” However, following a school year marred by the epidemic, young people speak frankly about issues ranging from racism to their mental health.

Pandemic as a chance

The virtual meetings, which were covered by high school and college students affiliated with the journalism education charity Urban Health Media Project, provided insight into the state of American teenagers who had endured an emotional roller coaster over the last year.

At a Staten Island session, student speakers discussed mental health and racial justice – in part because the two are inextricably linked.

“Racism is a mental health concern because it results in trauma,” said Curtis High School senior Qawiyat Adesina.

“Organizing burns us out,” said Janelle Astorga-Ramos, co-founded an Albuquerque student advocacy group in 2015.

What is the next step?

As the panel talks came to a close, Azariah Estes, a junior at Ritenour High School in St. Louis, stated that one question was “floating about – ‘What next?'”.

There were numerous suggestions.

They include forming high school groups devoted to specific problems and joining community organizations that do the same.

In St. Louis, these measures include increasing the number of licensed therapists in schools, requiring a parent or guardian to attend all school safety discussions, creating “calm rooms” for students to center themselves, and having school safety officers – many of whom are former cops – dress in plainclothes rather than uniform.

“It only takes one person,” Wells explained, “but it is that individual’s responsibility to recruit 200 others.”

Whatever their ambitions, the students agreed that communication was necessary, particularly about frequently taboo topics, such as mental health. South Carolina students stated that they had witnessed an upsurge in teenage suicides and attempted suicides, but the issue is rarely mentioned. “It’s tragic that it takes so many people dying to bring up the subject,” said Elly Tate, an eighth-grader at Gaffney’s Ewing Middle School.

Reference
Kylie Jenner hugs Caitlyn Jenner and Sophia Hutchins amid …. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-6789965/Kylie-Jenner-hugs-Caitlyn-Jenner-Sophia-Hutchins-amid-turbulent-weeks.html.

Sophia Garcia, Sreehitha Gandluri, Rick Hampson, and Radiah Jamil,I am not alone’: Gen Z activists unite amid the COVID pandemic to confront racism and mental health. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2021/08/23/gen-z-covid-racism-mental-health-americas-promise-alliance/8204322002/

Drinking green tea

Researchers note, in healthy people, drinking green tea has been shown to increase brain function. Many researchers are trying to discover if the calming and energizing effects of tea directly result from the various compounds or whether they result from the place where it is consumed. Antioxidants such as epigallocatechin gallate (found in tea leaves) and L-theanine (found in tea leaves) are most essential. These two antioxidants are accompanied by caffeine, an alkaloid found in tea leaves. People drink 100 million cups of tea every day. Tea remains part of the national psyche even though the popularity of other hot beverages in the U.K. Coffee has long been the dominant beverage, tea consumption is increasing, with Americans drinking about 14 ounces of tea leaves per year compared to 12.7 ounces in 2007, according to the United Nations.


It has a wide range of benefits on mental health, anxiety, attention, and memory symptoms. We do not yet know which specific compounds in green tea are culpable for the wide range of positive changes in our mental health. Another benefit of tea for those who suffer from depression, dementia, and Down syndrome is reducing symptoms. The research looks at the potential benefits of tea, and its bioactive compounds are often observational, which uses people’s perceptions as a primary source of evidence. Professor Gunter Kuhnle studies the health benefits of flavanols, which are present in tea.


His previous study, which was released last year, showed that flavanol-rich foods, such as berries, apples, and tea, can help reduce blood pressure. It is a popular working-class drink; It is a status symbol in the U.K. There is no real downside to drinking a cup of tea, and certain types of tea can benefit one’s health and overall well-being – which relates to both physical health and physical well-being, as noted by Dr. Benefits of drinking hot tea include weight loss, better heart health, and reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. Green tea is likely a combination of caffeine and L-theanine rather than the other, acting as the sole ingredient. Researchers state that drinking green tea has been shown to increase brain function in healthy people.

The evidence comprises smaller studies, although the results are modest. It is less clear which compounds are efficient for the observed cognitive enhancements, although there is general agreement on the effectiveness of the compounds in tea. Tea is associated with a longer life and can help to minimize cardiovascular disease risk factors.

Reference

Here’s how drinking tea helps improve your mental and physical health. https://www.wtae.com/article/drinking-tea-helps-improve-your-mental-and-physical-health/36516958#

Improve your overall well-being

Approved activities, such as exercise or writing in a journal, can be very safe and beneficial in the morning. You may have a subconscious illusion that completing your morning routine will improve your overall well-being, so you complete it, or you can stop now, Alison Nobrega said. You need to set aside time in the mornings to get your children washed, fed, and ready for school. You can value 30 minutes of extra sleep in the morning before getting ready for work, even if you do not have children. When you get out of bed, snoozing leaves you tired. Many experts would inform you that getting into the habit of writing in the morning is beneficial, and this is real. As a daily routine, forcing yourself to do this first thing in the morning will not suit everybody.

Reference

6 Morning Habits That Seem Healthy But Are Secretly Stressing You Out. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/morning-habits-healthy-stress_l_60a689c3e4b0a24c4f795c34

Mental fatigue

“The collective way many people in the United States may feel now probably indicates mental fatigue,” said Stephen O’Connor, a clinical psychologist and head of the National Mental Health Suicide Prevention Research Program. “There’s a difference between being alone and feeling alone,” said John Draper, executive director of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Here are some ways experts say you can be here for your loved ones, even if you can’t be there. It is possible to notice signs that someone is going through a difficult period, even if you do not interact in person, experts said.

Regular video calls can give you “eyes on the spot,” said Dan Reidenberg, CEO of Suicide Awareness Voices of Education. Reidenberg recommended asking targeted questions about the person’s behavior and home life if you feel that you cannot observe enough. It’s also important to pay attention to the “absence of things,” said Nadine Kaslow, a psychiatry and behavioral sciences professor at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. If people ignore your phone calls and text messages and don’t post on social media as often as they used to, or refuse invitations to virtual holidays, Kaslow said it’s potentially a sign.

Standardize mental health conversations
Although one of the “silver linings” makes it more acceptable to talk about mental health, some people still find it challenging to open up, Kaslow said. “Everyone is kind of stressed out and burned out, so they don’t have the kind of mental resources to get involved,” said Kaslow, a former president of the American Psychological Association. Talking about mental health should be similar to asking people about their physical health, said Doreen Marshall, vice president of missionary involvement at the American Suicide Prevention Foundation. “We have to do the same thing about mental health conversations and say, ‘Hey, I’m watching you.’

Don’t be afraid to ask about self-harm or suicide.

Many people are reluctant to ask someone directly if they have been thinking about self-harm, Draper said. They may be afraid that he will cause insult or that he will put the idea in that person’s head.

Stay connected and watch
“A physical feeling, such as comfort, safety, and security, when someone is anxious and happy: ‘Oh, this is the person who is ultimately responsible for ensuring that I am safe. And they’re literally across the table, “Singer said. Even if you can’t be physical with someone who is having a hard time, there are many ways to remind them that they still have strong ties to the people who care for them, Draper said.
Reference:
How to talk to loved ones when you’re worried about their mental health. https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/mental-health-suicide-help-covid/2020/11/30/af45a7a6-2e88-11eb-96c2-aac3f162215d_story.html

The diversional practice helps individuals to overcome the challenges and problems

The diversional practice helps individuals to overcome the challenges and problems in their everyday lives, and in some instances, to even reach an optimum existence outside the defined realities of time and space — a condition we term “flow.” Occupation can redirect citizens away from the difficulties of their lives toward happiness and positive participation. Habits have been found to improve knowledge, decrease exhaustion, free focus, and defend individuals against the stressful consequences of challenging conditions. During daunting situations, the profession provides the opportunity for a richer, more cohesive self after the crisis settles.

Reference
Seven constructive ways to get through the Covid-19 pandemic.https://www.cnn.com/2020/12/18/health/constructive-activities-covid-pandemic-wellness-partner/index.html

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted so many facets of our lives

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted so many facets of our lives for eight months. Moreover, many parents are suffering from their children’s mental well-being. For most learners, zoom or hybrid education is the only alternative right now. Mental health professionals agree that paying attention to your child is more critical than ever because of students’ tremendous burden.

Most students think about the future and feel nervous, afraid, and even depressed. Experts believe this is because many students no longer have the sense of order and excitement that school offers.

Reference
COVID-19’s impact on property tax assessments – REJournals. https://rejournals.com/covid-19s-impact-on-property-tax-assessments/
How families can help their students as pandemic, hybrid learning takes its toll on mental health. https://wgntv.com/news/coronavirus/how-families-can-help-their-students-as-pandemic-hybrid-learning-takes-its-toll-on-mental-health/