Did you know that unvaccinated are 14 times more likely to get monkeypox, data from eligible shot recipients shows?

Those who have not had the vaccine for monkeypox are 14 times more likely to get the illness than those who have, according to fresh, but limited, statistics released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday morning.

The sampled population consists of males who engage in sexual behavior with other men or persons with several sexual partners. The figures provide our first glimpse at how effectively the JYNNEOS vaccine, the most effective method of protection against monkeypox, functions in the real world.

At a briefing on monkeypox held at the White House on Wednesday, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said, “These new data give us cautious comfort that the immunization is functioning as planned.”

Dr. Demetre Daskalaskis, the White House’s deputy response coordinator for monkeypox, requested that individuals disseminate the “early good news.”

He said that “information is power” and that it empowers people to make health-related decisions with more knowledge and confidence.

What caused the dramatic reduction in monkeypox cases in the United States?

Since the beginning of the current outbreak, there has been little information on the effectiveness of the JYNNEOS vaccine, which was initially designed to combat smallpox.

Since the outbreak began in May, the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institutes of Health have conducted many studies into the safety and effectiveness of the JYNNEOS vaccine, mostly at the request of LGBTQ community activists.

Walensky also observed that the new data is only a glimpse, while being optimistic. Concerning the extent of JYNNEOS’s protection, several questions remain unresolved.

For instance, the new vaccination efficacy rate was not predicated on two doses given 28 days apart. Instead, it relied on information gathered two weeks after the first shot.

Even though the majority of federal public health experts advocate two doses, the CDC has not yet provided information on the effectiveness of the vaccine after all doses have been administered.

“These early results, together with similar findings from studies undertaken in other countries, suggest that even a single dose of the monkeypox vaccine gives at least some initial protection against disease. In spite of this, laboratory studies have shown that immune protection reaches its peak two weeks following the second vaccination dose, or “Wednesday,” as Walensky said.

She said, “Because of this, we continue to recommend that individuals get two doses of the JYNNEOS vaccine, 28 days apart, in order to provide robust, long-lasting protection against monkeypox.”

According to Walensky, further study is being conducted on the efficacy of two dosages.

The CDC has not yet separated the efficacy data for various injection techniques to see whether there are any differences between the current approach, in which a lower dosage is injected just beneath the skin, and the earlier way, in which a deeper injection is administered.

Also unclear is the extent to which changes in behavior might influence the effectiveness of the vaccination results.

If vaccinated individuals have fewer sexual partners and possibilities for skin-to-skin contact, they may be less likely to get monkeypox.

Eliminating monkeypox is feasible, according to experts, but containing the disease remains challenging.

According to Walensky, a key lesson from COVID-19 is that the CDC intends to make all of its existing data accessible in real time as soon as it becomes available, even while additional data are on the way.

“Through a portfolio of vaccine effectiveness programs, [the] CDC will continue to analyze how well these immunizations are functioning in the continuing outbreak. These endeavors will assist us in determining the extent and duration of the protection provided. “We’ll continue to provide you with further details as they become available,” Walensky added.

Even though the JYNNEOS vaccine is not yet approved for use by the general public, the CDC is expanding the number of at-risk Americans who are eligible to get vaccination against monkeypox.

The inclusion now includes gay or bisexual men who have had one recent romantic relationship or who have just received a new diagnosis of one or more STDs. It also includes sex workers.

Although many states and jurisdictions have already expanded eligibility, the CDC’s latest step puts it more in line with regional guidelines.

Monkeypox caused the death of a citizen of Los Angeles County

Monkeypox caused the death of a citizen of Los Angeles County who had a weakened immune system, according to the announcement made by local health authorities on Monday. It is considered to be the first mortality in the United States caused by the illness.

A patient with the rash associated with monkeypox. Photo: Getty Images


The Department of Public Health for Los Angeles County made the announcement on the cause of death, and a representative for the department said that an autopsy verified the information. The patient had a significantly impaired immune system and had been admitted to the hospital. There was no more information about the individual that was made public.
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) monitors instances of the disease and reports that it has not been linked to any fatalities in the United States. Officials from LA County have said that they collaborated with the CDC on this matter.
 
When asked if this was the first death in the U.S., a CDC representative acknowledged that they were working together but didn’t answer right away.
 
On August 30, authorities from the Texas Department of Public Health stated that an individual who had been diagnosed with monkeypox had passed away. The individual was also critically immunocompromised, and an examination is now being conducted into their case to establish the possible impact that monkeypox had in their passing.
 
The virus that causes monkeypox is contagious and can only be passed from person to person via prolonged skin-to-skin contact. It may bring on symptoms such as a rash, fever, pains all over the body, and chills. The illness has been directly connected to the deaths of just a small number of individuals all across the globe, and hospitalizations and fatalities are quite uncommon.
 
People who are in close contact with someone who has the disease; people who are aware that a sexual partner was diagnosed within the past two weeks; and gay or bisexual men who have had multiple sexual partners within the past two weeks in an area where it is known that the virus is spreading are all encouraged to get the monkeypox vaccine. It is also suggested that health care workers who are at a high risk of exposure get vaccinations.