Category Archives: genetics

Did you know that in the face of anti-Asian prejudice, these organizations agree on the next steps to be taken?

The United States observes Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

There has been an increase in the amount of violence directed against this community. According to the survey, women reported 61.8 percent of all hate events, with verbal harassment accounting for 63% of all instances and physical assault accounting for 16.2 percent. Stop AAPI Hatred is one of the various organizations formed to assist the AANHPI community. It was founded in March 2020 to detect and react to anti-Asian hate. The San Francisco-based organization invites individuals to report any abuse they have experienced so that the data may be used to better understand what is going on throughout the nation and how to combat it.


They also provide a framework for public policy to prevent harassment and bigotry. Soar Over Hate, located in New York, is another organization that was formed in response to the violence. The organization assists victims of anti-Asian hate crimes in obtaining self-defense weapons. They also provide a grant to high school students as well as a therapeutic fund that covers up to ten free therapy sessions. AAPI Women Lead looks at how AAPI women, girls, and gender-expansive populations are represented in the United States.


The organization, based in Oakland, California, has been working to reduce hate crimes. According to Tran, violence against women and our gender nonconforming or gender expansive groups is intersectional. Racial and patriarchal violence affect Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. A panel on mental, emotional, and spiritual wellness in the AANHPI community will be held during AAPI Women Lead. Acupuncturists, herbal medicine practitioners, and intuitive healers will be on the panel. As Connie Wun, co-founder and executive director, remarked, they reclaim our practices as a component of our resistance.

You might not have known this, but a study called “Landmark” found that people who smoke are more likely to get Alzheimer’s.

The biggest Alzheimer’s study ever finds new genes and pathways involved in disease progression.

silhouette of a person showing internal nervous system and brain on a blue background surrounded by dna

CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES

The groundbreaking study’s findings imply physicians can better anticipate whether a patient is genetically prone to Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s disease affects over 5.8 million Americans. Researchers from France’s Universit√© de Lille performed the study. A genetic risk score may help determine who is most likely to develop Alzheimer’s.

To better understand Alzheimer’s and create medicines that delay or prevent the disease start, the research represents a huge step forward. The next stage is for researchers to concentrate on the study’s risk genes and their influence in brain cell malfunction and death.

Would you like to know that a human genome has finally been fully decoded?

The genome of a single sperm contains the genetic material of one pair of paternal chromosomes.

Researcher Kevin Bishop looks at zebrafish samples. Techniques used to sequence the human genome can also be applied to other species. Ernesto Del Aguila III / National Institutes of Health

Researchers are re-analyzing 92 percent of the genome to look for genetic variants that may be causing illnesses. “We identified many more, tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands” of new variants, says David Dennis. In addition, researchers can better investigate how centromere proteins assemble and what happens when they alter or lose function using the new genome. As part of his research, Evan Eichler aims to decode the genetic code on paternal and maternal chromosomes. By systematically sequencing a large number of individuals from diverse origins, he claims that it would be possible to better understand the genetic variation of the globe and identify relevant genetic variants.

Reference

A human genome has finally been fully decoded. https://www.nbcnews.com/science/science-news/human-genome-finally-fully-decoded-rcna22029?fbclid=IwAR0dGb_i9ckxLcACA777uZcg4BCAUPLDfwMJw2t65P_WNw2rxeHj_i9QU_E