India International Spiritual Art Festival in Coimbatore

At the ongoing India International Spiritual Art Festival in Coimbatore, a replica of the Nettipattam, a golden mask used to ornament elephants’ foreheads during temple celebrations in Kerala, is displayed in a sparkling and colorful version. As well as an ethnographic nettipattam created by artist Shobha Prem utilizing gold-plated fiber domes, various other exhibitions take center stage during the virtual event (https://SpiritualArtFestival.org/) that will continue for 100 days until November 8, 2021.

From glittering ‘nettipattams’ and crochet art to sculptures, this 100-day virtual exhibition has it all

The exhibition features artworks and sculptures by over 70 artists from India, Poland, South Africa, and Oman, all of whom are inspired by the themes of meditation, awakening, spirituality, knowledge, and inner calm. Vernika Singh’s beautiful sculptures, constructed of aluminum and mild steel, depict humans in Surya-namaskar poses, with the postures, motions, and gestures of the practice highlighted. The bare figures, which are more concerned with the anatomy than face features, quickly capture the viewer’s attention. In Pune, Manasa Priya creates crochet art inspired by children, and Kuppaana Kandgal’s oil paintings include peaceful textures reminiscent of nature. Ishrath Humairah produces fascinating landscapes in abstract textures based on rocks, plants, and the natural world. Her work is exhibited internationally. Finally, Mauli Shah’s kaleidoscope series, painted in watercolors, reflects the banality of everyday life.

According to Blake Willis, a professor of anthropology and education at Fielding Graduate University in California who spoke in a video message on the website, “the art show is an expression of emotions including love, compassion, enlightenment, knowledge, sisterhood, brotherhood, forgiveness, and more.” “It provides deserving artists with a worldwide platform to display their work,” says the curator. We are looking forward to taking in the artwork and learning about the people who created it.”

In addition to being the festival’s director, Kalki Subramaniam is also a transgender activist and novelist. She says the festival promotes emerging artists, with one Delhi-based artist selling five works in a week. “During a pandemic, spiritual power is something we can rely on to keep our cool,” she continues, adding that.

Gautam Jhanjee, an artist, residing in Canberra, has pieces on display at the event. His calligraphic art is inspired by the diverse cultures of his hometown and Maharashtrian and Punjabi influences from India, Oman, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Australia, among other places. Artist Bridget Paul Shibu, who co-curated the event with Kalki, explains that the focus is on lesser-known artists and their experiments with various media in this exhibition. “Muthiah Kasi from Auroville adheres to the use of ethnic, non-toxic earth colors in his creations. Nandkumar Yashwant Kulaye, a Mumbai-based artist, creates abstract constructions out of wood, metal, fiberglass, and sandstone, among other materials. “The show has opened my eyes,” says the actor.

Reference

India International Spiritual Art Festival explores inner peace,https://www.thehindu.com/entertainment/art/india-international-spiritual-art-festival-explores-inner-peace/article36076436.ece1/photo/1/

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